I’m a sleep doctor, but as a kid, I was always more sleepy and tired than my peers. I loved books and would stay up late reading my favorite series (these days, this would be called bedtime procrastination!). This always made me very sleepy in the afternoon, and I got into the habit of taking a nap after school. In high school and university, I had a really hard time getting up for morning classes and going to bed on time. Looking back now, I understand that I have delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS), a circadian rhythm disorder that causes you to want to go to sleep later and wake up later than society usually dictates.

Medical school and residency were an even bigger challenge because of the early mornings, demanding work hours, and irregular schedules. My personal challenges with sleep quality contributed to my interest in pursuing a career in sleep medicine. 

Currently, I sleep well and know what to do to stay on track and enhance my sleep quality. I usually have my best night’s sleep when I get bright light in the morning, stay active during the day, and allow myself time to wind down in the evening. Simple things have a big impact and I teach these steps to my patients in my practice and in my online holistic sleep course.

My biggest barriers to sleep are not staying on a consistent schedule, not getting enough movement during the day, or working on my laptop too late in the evening. If I don’t give myself a cut-off time, I could keep on working, checking emails, or scrolling social media…and I definitely don’t sleep as well when I do that. 

Rest is the basis of all activity and restorative sleep allows me to function with vitality. It gives me the energy and motivation to focus on the things I find meaningful, supports me in navigating challenges that might come my way, and allows me to feel fully present with the people around me. 



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